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SCCS Autumn Seminar: Dr. Maartje Boon - Impact of capillary induced flow on multiphase flow behavior and its implications for CO2 residual trapping

Date and Time: 
October 9, 2018 - 12:30pm to 1:15pm
Location: 
Green Earth Sciences Building, Room 14

Refreshments at 12:15 pm

Impact of capillary induced flow on multiphase flow behavior and its implications for CO2 residual trapping

Speaker: Dr. Maartje Boon

Abstract:
A good understanding of the migration of the injected CO2 plume and how this is impacted by capillary heterogeneity is needed to ensure long-term security of the injected CO2. Residual trapping is one of the main mechanisms for immobilizing CO2 after the injection phase of a geological sequestration project. Residual trapping results from capillary forces at the pore scale which lead to snap-off and bypass of CO2. For heterogeneous systems, there is, in addition to the capillary potential at the pore scale, a capillary potential at the scale of the heterogeneity which will result in capillary induced flows and trapping. We investigate the impact of capillary induced flow on multiphase flow behavior and its implications for residual trapping of CO2 by performing experimental and numerical core-flood tests. Results show that the magnitude and spatial extent of the heterogeneity impact the local capillary forces and, therefore, the capillary pressure and saturation distribution. In certain cases, even in the capillary dominated regime, local capillary disequilibrium was observed, leading to capillary induced flow when the system relaxed. This work shows that for layered rock with small variations in permeability, laminations direction has minimal impact on the local capillary forces and does not effect the residual trapping potential. Further research is needed to investigate if lamination direction impacts the residual trapping potential in the case of layered rocks with larger variations in permeability.

About the Speaker

Maartje Boon joined Stanford University in 2017 as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Department of Energy Resources Engineering in the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences. She combines experimental techniques involving X-Ray CT imaging with numerical modelling to look at the impact of rock structure heterogeneities on multiphase flow properties and its implications for Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS). She obtained her PhD degree in Petroleum Engineering from Imperial College London where she was part of the Qatar Carbonate and Carbon Storage Research Centre (QCCSRC). During her PhD she developed a new experimental technique to observe solute spreading and mixing in natural consolidated rock.

 

Contact Email: 
anshula@stanford.edu